PracticeAccounting FirmsThe Practitioner: Part-time FD, Superman, control freak

The Practitioner: Part-time FD, Superman, control freak

The Practitioner is in demand with clients – but is struggling to give other staff members the opportunity to shine

The Practitioner: Part-time FD, Superman, control freak

“IT DOESN’T RAIN BUT IT POURS.” I genuinely don’t have the time to search on Google to find out who originally said that well-coined phrase, but it’s never been truer than the past couple of weeks. We have recently acquired three new clients who were attracted to our ‘part-time finance director’ offering, which we have been marketing recently. 

One of them is a day per fortnight, while the other two clients want a half-day a week from us. I say us – I mean me.

I don’t like to blow my own trumpet (well, not too often), but word has got round that I’m a bit of a Superman when it comes to effecting the part-time FD role and, despite my best efforts to try to appoint a member of team to the assignments, they wanted me in my cape, blue tights and red y-fronts.

Don’t get me wrong – I’m not complaining. It’s a niche we seem to have developed and it is acting as a good buffer while we grow the ‘regular’ accountancy side of things.

However, there is a part of me that feels the need to be in the office, and the more time I spend out of the office, I feel like I’m losing control. I’m probably a bit of a control freak on the QT, even though I know the staff team is more than capable of running things.

As I sit here overlooking a well-lit business village of mostly empty properties, I notice my diary shows me being in the office only 3 days in the next couple of weeks. It looks like the weekend golf competition will have to wait again; I need to have my fix of being in the office and weekends provide the ideal opportunity to do that. There is definitely something reassuring about being sat your own desk, sifting through your own in-tray, and drinking coffee from your own mug!

I guess that I am going to have to grow to allow the business to grow, and learn to let go – slightly.

The Practitioner’s uncensored thoughts originally came from the coalface of a regional firm in the heart of England – but are now from within their own practice

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