TaxPersonal TaxChina’s revised tax forms target stocks, property

China’s revised tax forms target stocks, property

High income earners in China have to declare profits from stocks and property transactions when filing tax returns from next year

The Chinese tax administration has allayed fears the new format of next
year’s tax form for high-income earners with incomes of more than yuan120,000
(?7891) a year signalled a new tax on stock trading gains.

The official
China
Securities Journal
reported the new tax form would require separate
disclosure of gains from property and stock transactions. Previously, these two
categories were undifferentiated in the ‘gains in property transfers’ category
of income.

Earnings from the A-share market are exempt from tax but earnings from
property transactions are subject to a 20% tax on the profits.

The state administration of taxation estimates about 1.63m mainland Chinese,
or 96% of those earning more than yuan120,000 a year, filed their tax returns
earlier this year, according to China’s first annual tax-return filing database
estimates.

Further reading:

KPMG enjoys dramatic growth in China

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