TaxPersonal TaxBig Brother’s Craig gets saucy with Mel

Big Brother's Craig gets saucy with Mel

Big Brother winner Craig Phillips joined Treasury minister Melanie Johnson in a bath of cold baked beans at the launch of a government campaign to double the amount of money given to charities through the payroll.

The stunt aimed to show there were easier and more tax effective ways to raise more for charities by getting employers to deduct regular amounts from employees pay packets.

Deductions made through the payroll-giving scheme are deducted before tax so a £10 gift costs just £7.80, £6 if they are a higher rate taxpayer.

In addition, the government will add an extra 10p to every pound given until April 2003, which means that charities will effectively receive £11.

Big Brother Craig from Merseyside, said: ‘Not everyone gets the opportunities I’ve had to raise money for a cause close to their heart. Giving money through your pay packet may not seem as exciting as spending 64 days in a house with Anna and Darren, but I assure you that your favourite charity will really benefit.’

The Treasury’s Melanie Johnson said: ‘Stunts such as sitting in a bath of beans might not suit all of us, but that does not mean we are any less generous when it comes to giving money to charity.’

Links

The TreasuryInland Revenue: Payroll giving

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