TaxAdministrationTaxman increases use of terror laws

Taxman increases use of terror laws

MPs told taxman is using surveillance laws

MPs have been told HM Revenue & Customs used controversial surveillance
laws intended for dealing with terrorists in 5,600 investigations last year.

According to the
Daily Mail
usage of the laws have increased 75% in four years.

Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act officials are permitted to
follow and watch people or informants.

HMRC claims the powers are only used where there is a suspicion of smuggling
drugs, arms or in major VAT cases such as carousel fraud.

The Mail says critics the taxman could use the laws to investigate minor tax
cases.

The paper claims there is already concern about the use of the laws by local
authorities.

Read more:

Surveillance
world

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