TaxAdministrationTreasury to get greater tax-setting role

Treasury to get greater tax-setting role

Gordon Brown is expected to announce a more dominant role for the Treasury in UK taxation policy as part of his pre-Budget report on 10 December.

Link: Caution advised in tax body merger

The move is thought to be part of a review into the operations of the Inland Revenue and Customs & Excise, commissioned by the chancellor in July, in the wake of a series of blunders in tax legislation and administration, according to a report in the Financial Times.

Commentators expect the Treasury to play a greater role in setting tax policies, heading off the potential erosion of the UK’s authority over its own tax base by the European courts.

A possible merger of Customs and the Revenue, or some part of their operations, is also likely to come up for consideration as part of the review.

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