TechnologyAccounting SoftwareKlez named worst virus of the year

Klez named worst virus of the year

UK-based anti-virus firm Sophos revealed the Klez worm has accounted for almost a quarter of reports to its customer support department this year, and topped the company's monthly chart for seven months in succession.

Link: Next computer virus could cost UK £2.1bn

The second most common virus was the Bugbear worm, which makes the number two slot even though it was only detected in October.

‘Unlike previous chart toppers like the LoveBug, which disappeared almost as quickly as it arrived, Klez is the ultimate in slowburning worms. It has managed to consistently infect users throughout the year,’ said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos Anti-Virus.

‘Protection against Klez has been available for as long as the worm has been circulation. The only possible explanation for its continued ‘success’ is that some users are habitually neglecting to update their anti-virus software.’

Despite Klez being the most active, antivirus company Messagelabs said that Bugbear can lay claim to being the most dramatic outbreak of the year, the company said it was stopping one every 87 emails at its height in October – Klez could only reach one in every 169 even at its peak.

Alex Shipp, senior antivirus technologist at MessageLabs, said: ‘A ratio of just over one in every 200 emails proves that 2002 has seen a major rise in the number of viruses in circulation, even if we haven’t seen the dramatic outbreaks of previous years.’

‘The more prevalent viruses this year have been the ones most people have found hardest to spot – like Klez and Bugbear. This is because these are able to ‘spoof’ email addresses, so that the identity of the real sender is difficult to trace. It also means that by mass mailing contacts from a recipient’s address book, further victims are likely to open the rogue email, because they think it is from someone they know and trust.’

Both Messagelabs and Sophos said they had noticed a worrying increase in the number of new trojan horses being created.

Shipp said: ‘We have noticed that there is a shift from creating new viruses to the virus writers bringing out new trojans. We have intercepted these being sent to big companies, presumably if they were hit, this would be a feather in the cap for the viruses writers.’

Clulely agreed: ‘We are generally seeing an increase in the use of Trojan Horses to break in and steal passwords.’

Related Articles

5 key tech innovations helping accountants transform their businesses

Accounting Software 5 key tech innovations helping accountants transform their businesses

3w Heather Darnell, Founder of Ask the BOSS
Finance and the tech foundation: what’s needed to deliver impactful business insights?

Accounting Software Finance and the tech foundation: what’s needed to deliver impactful business insights?

3m Workday | Sponsored
Best accounting software for businesses in the UK

Accounting Software Best accounting software for businesses in the UK

3m Accountancy Age, Reporters
Making sense of enterprise tech concepts for finance teams

Accounting Software Making sense of enterprise tech concepts for finance teams

4m Workday | Sponsored
Open Banking: what you need to know

Accounting Software Open Banking: what you need to know

4m Edward Berks, Xero
Accountancy in the digital age: Flexibility, agility, efficiency

Accounting Software Accountancy in the digital age: Flexibility, agility, efficiency

6m Pegasus Software | Sponsored
Sage purchases Intacct in its largest ever acquisition

Accounting Software Sage purchases Intacct in its largest ever acquisition

10m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
5 tips for SMEs to protect cash flow

Accounting Software 5 tips for SMEs to protect cash flow

10m Alia Shoaib, Reporter