TaxCorporate TaxTop 50 firm is late on accounts

Top 50 firm is late on accounts

Hazlewoods is four months late filing its accounts expects to post its figures by the end of the month

A top 50 firm that is four months late filing its accounts expects to post
its figures by the end of the month.

Hazlewoods, which was ranked 38 in last year’s Accountancy Age top
50 survey, was meant to file its accounts by 31 December 2006, but the firm has
yet to do so.

The firm offered no reason for the delay. A spokeswoman said there was ‘no
problem whatsoever’ with the company’s accounts, and the filing would be made by
the end of May. Hazlewoods incorporated as an LLP in February 2005.

A Companies House spokesman would not discuss individual cases, but said
companies late in filing accounts are issued standard letters warning them they
are late, and eventually the company could face fines or an appearance in court.

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