TaxPersonal TaxSetback for self-assessment e-filing

Setback for self-assessment e-filing

The Inland Revenue has failed to launch its website for filing self-assessment returns to the public on time and announced a delay of at least a month - prompting fears further delays could be on the cards.

Revenue officials said the delay was due to incomplete testing of the system – which was due to go live at the end of April. It will not now function until the end of May at the earliest.

Meanwhile, Revenue electronic business unit head, Terry Hawes, also confirmed the system for giving taxpayers £10 discounts for filing over the Web would not work until January 2001, as exclusively revealed by Accountancy Age in March.

The self-assessment website opened on 3 April for registrations, but was expected to be able to receive returns as of last week.

A Revenue spokeswoman, said: ‘We are continuing to do further testing of safety checks to make sure the system is secure and running smoothly before we launch.’No further testing delays are expected, but the Revenue refused to set a definitive date of when the system would now go fully live.

The spokeswoman added: ‘We do not believe any other aspects or dates surrounding e-filing will be affected. We are also confident the security will be as secure as possible by the time we launch.’

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