TaxPersonal TaxSweet message from Revenue rock

Sweet message from Revenue rock

As if using a down-trodden comedy tea lady wasn't enough, the Inland Revenue has enlisted that peculiarly British treat - seaside rock - to help promote its message.

It has emerged the Revenue in Edinburgh commissioned a special edition rock from confectioners with the department’s name written through the middle.

The rock was intended as a promotional gift to be given away from the Revenue’s stand at the city’s annual Asian festival two weeks ago.

Using the rock to promote the tax collectors follows the launch of Mrs Doyle – the slightly batty tea lady from Channel 4’s hit comedy series Father Ted – to advertise self-assessment deadlines on television.

The Revenue is also known to be working with top advertising agency M&C Saatchi to develop a marketing campaign.

The rock however, is a new innovation. A Revenue spokesman said: ‘We weren’t trying to sweeten our image because we don’t think we need to. It was promoting the Revenue just as any other organisation promotes itself.’

Reports have emerged of condemnation from dentists for the stunt because rock causes tooth decay.

The Revenue however, said it was not a ‘huge amount’ of rock that was given away.

Links

Revenue debut for Mrs Doyle

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