TaxPersonal TaxYankees official pleads guilty to tax fraud

Yankees official pleads guilty to tax fraud

The travelling secretary to the famous Yankees baseball team has pleaded guilty to filing a false income tax return

The former travelling secretary of the famous
Yankees
baseball team, David Szen, was formally fired after pleading guilty in the US
District Court of New Haven, Connecticut, to filing a false federal income tax
return.

Szen faces the maximum of six months in prison and a fine of up to $US10,000,
in addition to the taxes owed and penalties and interest after admitting in
court he had failed to disclose $US53,350 (?27,000) in tips from players and
coaches over a five-year period. The authorities said Szen owed $US10,285 in
taxes on those earnings.

The magnitude of the loss is small when compared with typical tax cases that
involve the Internal Revenue
Service
, The New York Times reports. The judge confirmed with the
parties the total tax loss of $US10,285 for all five years was correct.

Many players and coaches tip travelling secretaries, usually after a season.
Yankee players and staffers, including the travelling secretary, also get a
postseason share of the profit, which was $26,304 for each of the last years
when the Yankees were eliminated in the first round.

Further reading:

Hundreds of US tax officials caught snooping at
records

Read
story in The New York Times

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