TaxPersonal TaxUS taxman in Saturday opening

US taxman in Saturday opening

The Internal Revenue Service opens offices on Saturdays to enable people who do not normally file tax returns to do so in order to claim economic stimulus payments.

The US taxman is opening at the weekend to deal in order to give away money.

The Internal Revenue Service is opening offices to manage the ‘stimulus
payments’ it is administering. It has already opened once at the weekend, on
March 29, and intends to do so again soon.

Economic stimulus payments were introduced earlier this year to address
economic malaise in the US. In order to claim payments, US taxpayers who may not
normally file tax returns are required to do so. The weekend openings are
designed to help them do that.

Offices will be open again next Saturday, April 12, from 9am to 1pm local
time and a toll free phone line will be available for enquiries from 10am to 3pm
on the same day.

Starting from May, more than 130 million households will receive stimulus
payments.

A person is eligible if they have a valid Social Security Number and have an
income tax liability of at least $3,000 (£1,500). Eligible individuals will
receive between $300 and $600. Those who are eligible and file a joint return
will receive a total of between $600 and $1,200. Those with children will get an
additional $300 for each qualifying child.

Further reading:

IRS
plans another Super Saturday

Basic
Information on the Stimulus Payments

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