TaxPersonal TaxTaxpayers hit with demands after HMRC computer glitch

Taxpayers hit with demands after HMRC computer glitch

Hundreds of thousands of taxpayers sent incorrect notices from HMRC asking for money

hmrc

A computer error may have resulted in hundreds of thousands of individuals
been mistakenly asked for money by HM
Revenue & Customs
.

The mistake was uncovered by
the
BBC’s ‘Money Box’
programme and has been blamed on a glitch
in the HMRC computer system.

The notices asked workers to pay £371 each to make up their contributions to
the basic state pension. HMRC said it was unaware of how many of the £4.7m tax
notices that were issued were incorrect.

The computer error appears to have affected large employers, as workplaces
with over 250 employees were instructed to file returns for 2004/2005 online,
the FT
reports.

HMRC’s computers buckled under the numerous responses and ignored a number of
NI contributions in the process. The Revenue said it was working with the
businesses affected and would send letters to those who received the notices
mistakenly.

Further reading:

Business welcomes cancellation of filing date alignment

Deadlines overshadow online revamp

Tax advisers angry at HMRC call for after hours filing

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