TaxPersonal Tax860,000 miss Revenue SA deadline

860,000 miss Revenue SA deadline

The Inland Revenue has today revealed more than 860,000 taxpayers have failed to submit their self-assessment returns before the 31 January deadline - down from 900,000 last year.

Officials confirmed this week 8.25 million tax returns have been received, from a total of 9.11 million 2000/2001 SA returns sent out.

The figure will produce almost a £86m cash windfall for the Treasury from the £100 late penalty fines. The consistently high statistic suggests a hard core of taxpayers continually file late returns.

PwC tax partner, John Whiting, said: ‘The number of returns not sent back on time remains very high. We need a clear investigation into why so many people are defaulting, not banal adverts which are a waste of money.’

But the Revenue said it was happy with the figures. A spokeswoman, said: ‘We are delighted with the figures and have beaten our target for the year. We aimed to have 90.5% of returns in on time, but got 90.6%. Mrs Doyle is enjoying a celebratory cuppa.’

Some 75,000 returns were filed electronically, up from 38,981 last year.

Related Articles

LITRG urges government to consider tax changes in disability work plan

Administration LITRG urges government to consider tax changes in disability work plan

2d Lucy Skoulding, Reporter
HMRC appeal rejected in Tottenham Hotspur case

Administration HMRC appeal rejected in Tottenham Hotspur case

2w Emma Smith, Managing Editor
HMRC urged to clarify impact of income allowances on Self-Assessments

Personal Tax HMRC urged to clarify impact of income allowances on Self-Assessments

2m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
New trading allowance: simplicity, but not as we know it

Administration New trading allowance: simplicity, but not as we know it

2m Emma Rawson, ATT Technical Officer
Wealthy individuals could circumvent top tax rate rises

Personal Tax Wealthy individuals could circumvent top tax rate rises

4m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
Italy grants first successful non-dom status application to former UK non-dom

Personal Tax Italy grants first successful non-dom status application to former UK non-dom

4m Emma Smith, Managing Editor
Industry reaction: Taylor Review does not go far enough in addressing tax issues

Legal Industry reaction: Taylor Review does not go far enough in addressing tax issues

5m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
Does the Taylor Review sufficiently address the gig economy?

Corporate Tax Does the Taylor Review sufficiently address the gig economy?

5m Alia Shoaib, Reporter