PracticeConsultingContractor numbers hit by tax changes

Contractor numbers hit by tax changes

New tax rules affecting small limited companies could lead to a shortage of IT contract workers and stifle economic recovery.

Link: Cheap labour forces IT contractors to leave UK

In last month’s budget chancellor Gordon Brown announced that small limited companies would pay 19% corporation tax on all profits paid as dividends. Currently, the first £10,000 of dividend income is exempt.

But in a survey by payroll service provider Giant, of almost 500 limited-company contractors, over half said they would change the way they operate rather than face the tax hike.

Of these, 48% said they would move into full-time employment or work overseas.

Matthew Brown, managing director of Giant, said: ‘As the economy rebounds businesses need to take on contractors to handle new projects and increasing workloads. If there aren’t enough temporary workers in the market, then businesses will face a skills shortage and rising contract costs.’

The chancellor claims the change simply closes an unfair tax loophole. But Matthew Brown believes the move could undermine the government’s stated strategy of encouraging a more flexible economy.

‘Profits are only just starting to grow again after a long period of stagnation in the contracting market so this new tax is unfortunate timing,’ he said.

‘If there are fewer contractors overall, that could be damaging for UK plc. It will mean a less flexible allocation of skills across the economy which could harm our long-term competitiveness,’ he added.

Since the introduction of the IR35 tax rules in 2000, many contractors have switched to working through third-party umbrella or composite companies. The new tax rises are expected to accelerate this trend. Over half of those contractors intending to give up their limited-company status said they would be most likely to join this type of organisation.

Brown said: ‘The services offered by umbrella and composite companies are growing in sophistication all the time. Contractors that work through them have more flexibility and enjoy many more benefits without any of the administrative burdens.’

According to Brown, other benefits of working in this way can include free contract reviews and insurance for IR35 and professional indemnity, as well as generous expense allowances.

Related Articles

5 tips for SMEs to protect cash flow

Accounting Software 5 tips for SMEs to protect cash flow

5m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
Tyrie on Finance Bill 2017: ‘Making Tax Policy Better’

Consulting Tyrie on Finance Bill 2017: ‘Making Tax Policy Better’

11m Stephanie Wix, Writer
Managing partner Q&A - the year ahead: Richard Toone, CVR Global

Accounting Firms Managing partner Q&A - the year ahead: Richard Toone, CVR Global

12m Kevin Reed, Writer
Deloitte 'self-imposes exile' on government contracts to defuse PM row

Accounting Firms Deloitte 'self-imposes exile' on government contracts to defuse PM row

12m Kevin Reed, Writer
Managing partner Q&A - the year ahead: Julie Adams, Menzies

Accounting Firms Managing partner Q&A - the year ahead: Julie Adams, Menzies

12m Kevin Reed, Writer
Friday Afternoon Live: Deloitte's tech thing; PAC wants HMRC 'contingencies'; and Sports Direct

Business Regulation Friday Afternoon Live: Deloitte's tech thing; PAC wants HMRC 'contingencies'; and Sports Direct

1y Kevin Reed, Writer
Friday Afternoon Live: HMRC complaints rise; Deloitte scoops big audits; and corporate reporting woes

Audit Friday Afternoon Live: HMRC complaints rise; Deloitte scoops big audits; and corporate reporting woes

1y Kevin Reed, Writer
New head of equity capital markets for KPMG

Accounting Firms New head of equity capital markets for KPMG

1y Stephanie Wix, Writer