TaxAdministrationPlumbers force Revenue to change ad campaign

Plumbers force Revenue to change ad campaign

HMRC changes wording on anti-tax avoidance ad

Revenue & Customs has been forced to re-word an ad campaign targeting
tradespeople that do not register their businesses for tax purposes, following
complaints from plumbers, the Daily Telegraph reported.

The Association of Plumbing & Heating Contractors and the Federation of
Small Businesses complained to the Advertising Standards Authority after ads
published in tabloid newspapers in December showed a plumber hiding under a
kitchen sink with the caption: ‘With your help, we’ll make sure self-employed
people who don’t pay their tax have nowhere to hide.’

The new advert now reads: ‘With your help, we’ll make sure people whose
business is not registered for tax have nowhere to hide.’

Related Articles

LITRG urges government to consider tax changes in disability work plan

Administration LITRG urges government to consider tax changes in disability work plan

4d Lucy Skoulding, Reporter
HMRC appeal rejected in Tottenham Hotspur case

Administration HMRC appeal rejected in Tottenham Hotspur case

3w Emma Smith, Managing Editor
HMRC issues updated Trusts Registration Service guidance

Administration HMRC issues updated Trusts Registration Service guidance

3w Emma Smith, Managing Editor
New trading allowance: simplicity, but not as we know it

Administration New trading allowance: simplicity, but not as we know it

2m Emma Rawson, ATT Technical Officer
‘Improve rather than lose’ disincorporation relief, tax body urges

Administration ‘Improve rather than lose’ disincorporation relief, tax body urges

3m Austin Clark, Reporter
Are you ready for the Trusts Registration Service?

Administration Are you ready for the Trusts Registration Service?

3m Helen Thornley, ATT Technical Officer
Advisers bullish despite Brexit concerns

Accounting Standards Advisers bullish despite Brexit concerns

1y Fraser Simpson, Reporter
Brexit: Five questions accountants should be asking

Accounting Firms Brexit: Five questions accountants should be asking

1y Fraser Simpson, Reporter