TaxAdministrationRevenue and Customs closer to merging

Revenue and Customs closer to merging

The Inland Revenue and Customs & Excise look set to merge after the comprehensive review of the two departments is completed.

The two departments will share office space in the Treasury building in Whitehall, according to reports.

A spokesman for Customs told the Telegraph: ‘They are still gutting the building, but obviously it would make sense to have interconecting doors as the whole idea is to bring the departments closer together. The moves are expected to take place in 2005.

Seperate boards could also be abolished as part of the review and one minister being handed the responsibility for both departments. With chairman of the Inland Revenue, Sir Nick Montagu, and his counterpart at Customs, Sir Richard broadbent, both set to leave in the near future, it seems the perfect time for fundamental changes to be made.

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