TaxCorporate TaxNAO to pick up Sir John Bourn’s chauffeur tax bill

NAO to pick up Sir John Bourn's chauffeur tax bill

NAO hit with £97,500 tax bill after failing to declare chauffeur-driven car of Sir John Bourn as a taxable benefit

Sir John Bourn

Sir John Bourn

The National Audit
Office
has been hit with a £97,500 tax bill going back six years after
failing to declare the chauffeur-driven car of Sir John Bourn as a taxable
benefit.

The tax bill on the £102,500 benefit has been paid out of the NAO budget.

An interest bill of £2,000 will also be met, while the NAO has set aside
£6,000 for a penalty payment.

The figures emerge from the remuneration report of the NAO’s 2007/08
accounts, which also disclose that benefits declared by Sir John in relation to
his wife’s travel on official trips had been increased by £5,300.

The tax investigation follows revelations in
Private Eye
magazine over Sir John’s chauffeur-driven car.

Exposure of the tax investigation may prove embarrassing for new auditor
general Tim Burr, who sat on the audit committee for the period covered.

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