TaxCorporate TaxGames companies want tax breaks

Games companies want tax breaks

Games companies demand breaks to compete with foreign - particularly Canadian - rivals

The British games industry is calling for tax breaks to allow it to compete
with foreign rivals.

‘The UK has become a very expensive place to develop games,’ said Ian
Livingstone, creative director at SCi, the owner of the Lara Croft Tomb Raider
franchise, a company which is moving production overseas.

‘We make the UK economy a small fortune but are still treated as pariahs. Why
they go on giving tax breaks to the film industry but not to us I don’t
understand,’ Ian Beverstock, chief executive of Kuju, a games developer, told
the
FT
.

Canada has been offering companies lucrative tax deals, meaning many games
production companies are moving their work there.

Further reading

Read
the FT story

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