TaxPersonal TaxRevenue finally records a hit

Revenue finally records a hit

Online self-assessment returns filed with the Inland Revenue for 2001/2 have burst through the 100,000 mark after just eight months - way ahead of 2000/1's full-year total of 71,304.

Link: Taxpayers get more time to file online

As Revenue officials brace themselves for a flood of forms this weekend, ahead of the first deadline on Monday, latest figures show online self-assessment is virtually doubling in popularity every year.

Online self-assessment’s first year ended on 31 January 2001 with 39,290 e-returns. By the close of the second year in January 2002 the figure had nearly doubled to 71,304. More than 100,000 online returns for the 2001/2 tax year had been received by last week, with more arriving every day.

A deadline extension from September to January, allowing online self-assessors to clear underpayments by amending their tax code, instead of making an upfront payment, is expected to further boost electronic self-assessment at the expense of traditional form-filling. A spokesman said: ‘It’s too early to predict full-year figures but we’re very pleased.’

Related Articles

HMRC appeal rejected in Tottenham Hotspur case

Administration HMRC appeal rejected in Tottenham Hotspur case

2w Emma Smith, Managing Editor
HMRC urged to clarify impact of income allowances on Self-Assessments

Personal Tax HMRC urged to clarify impact of income allowances on Self-Assessments

2m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
New trading allowance: simplicity, but not as we know it

Administration New trading allowance: simplicity, but not as we know it

2m Emma Rawson, ATT Technical Officer
Wealthy individuals could circumvent top tax rate rises

Personal Tax Wealthy individuals could circumvent top tax rate rises

4m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
Italy grants first successful non-dom status application to former UK non-dom

Personal Tax Italy grants first successful non-dom status application to former UK non-dom

4m Emma Smith, Managing Editor
Industry reaction: Taylor Review does not go far enough in addressing tax issues

Legal Industry reaction: Taylor Review does not go far enough in addressing tax issues

5m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
Does the Taylor Review sufficiently address the gig economy?

Corporate Tax Does the Taylor Review sufficiently address the gig economy?

5m Alia Shoaib, Reporter
HMRC tax evasion assistance requests double in five years

Corporate Tax HMRC tax evasion assistance requests double in five years

5m Emma Smith, Managing Editor