TaxPersonal TaxTA 1988, s 739

TA 1988, s 739

739 Prevention of avoidance of income tax

(1) Subject to section 747(4)(b), the following provisions of this section shall have effect for the purpose of preventing the avoiding by individuals ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom of liability to income tax by means of transfer of assets by virtue or in consequence of which, either alone or in conjunction with associated operations, income becomes payable to persons resident or domiciled outside the United Kingdom.
[(1A) Nothing in subsection (1) above shall be taken to imply that the provisions of subsections (2) and (3) apply only if –
(a) the individual in question was ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom at the time when the transfer was made; or
(b) the avoiding of liability to income tax is the purpose, or one of the purposes, for which the transfer was effected.]1
(2) Where by virtue or in consequence of any such transfer, either alone or in conjunction with associated operations, such an individual has, within the meaning of this section, power to enjoy, whether forthwith or in the future, any income of a person resident or domiciled outside the United Kingdom which, if it were income of that individual received by him in the United Kingdom, would be chargeable to income tax by deduction or otherwise, that income shall, whether it would or would not have been chargeable to income tax apart from the provisions of this section, be deemed to be income of that individual for all purposes of the Income Tax Acts.
(3) Where, whether before or after any such transfer, such an individual receives or is entitled to receive any capital sum the payment of which is in any way connected with the transfer or any associated operation, any income which, by virtue or in consequence of the transfer, either alone or in conjunction with associated operations, has become the income of a person resident or domiciled outside the United Kingdom shall, whether it would or would not have been chargeable to income tax apart from the provisions of this section, be deemed to be income of that individual for all purposes of the Income Tax Acts.
(4) In subsection (3) above “capital sum” means, subject to subsection (5) below –
(a) any sum paid or payable by way of loan or repayment of a loan, and
(b) any other sum paid or payable otherwise than as income, being a sum which is not paid or payable for full consideration in money or money’s worth.
(5) For the purposes of subsection (3) above, there shall be treated as a capital sum which an individual receives or is entitled to receive any sum which a third person receives or is entitled to receive at the individual’s direction or by virtue of the assignment by him of his right to receive it.
(6) Income shall not by virtue of subsection (3) above be deemed to be that of an individual for any year of assessment by reason only of his having received a sum by way of loan if that sum has been wholly repaid before the beginning of that year.

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