TaxCorporate TaxNFL asks for disclosure break

NFL asks for disclosure break

US American football league doesn't want to disclose its highest earners to the IRS

The US National Football League is asking for an exemption from new rules
requiring it to name high-earning officials.

The rules relate to tax-exempt organizations, and require them to reveal
names and salaries of those who earn more than $150,000 (£80,000),
webCPA.com
reported
.

The body has hitherto been disclosing the salary of its top commissioner, but
not other high executive salaries to the IRS, and is asking Congress to
intervene.

Approximately 25 more people would have to be listed on the NFL’s report, and
it does not want to reveal their personal financial information.

Further Reading:

Read the
webCPA.com story

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