The Big Four commit to disability inclusion with The Valuable 500

The Big Four commit to disability inclusion with The Valuable 500

The inclusion campaign is aimed at large companies, requiring the commitment of a chair or chief executive officer, to put disability inclusion at the top of the leadership's agenda.

The Big Four commit to disability inclusion with The Valuable 500

Deloitte UK, PwC UK and KPMG UK have signed onto disability inclusion campaign The Valuable 500, joining EY in supporting inclusivity in the business world.

Roughly 15% of the global population lives with some form of disability, so the campaign is focused on making sure disability inclusion is at the top of leadership agendas. With the Big Four signing onto the campaign, the accounting industry is taking a leap forward in terms of diversification and inclusion.

Caroline Casey, founder of The Valuable 500, said: “Momentum is building for disability inclusion and it is fantastic to see global competitors come together to collaborate and solve global inclusion issues. Undoubtedly this is a sign that the world is waking up to the current inequality crisis.”

The Valuable 500 partners with private sector corporations, asking them to commit to creating disability diversity in both the national and multinational workplace.

To join the campaign, the company’s chair or chief executive officer must provide their signature, committing to implementing the campaign’s values in 2019.

Speaking on the company’s inclusion, Carmine di Sibio, EY’s global chairman and chief executive officer, said: “Diversity and inclusion is part of the lifeblood of our organisation and we believe that we all need to work together across the globe to bring more attention to this important issue.”

So far, the campaign has partnered with 58 confirmed companies, including financial institutions like Barclays, Bank of England and Lloyds Banking Group. Across the confirmed companies, over two million employees are represented by their businesses.

Commitments in motion

This business-to-business initiative kicked off at the start of 2019 and quickly gathered the support of large companies, many of whom are already prioritising disability inclusion.

In an effort to create more accessible technology and jobs, PwC is also working with assistive technology providers to implement and raise awareness of specialised tools in the workplace.

Kevin Ellis, senior partner and chairman at PwC UK, said: “Businesses like ours have a responsibility to promote inclusion and equality, and as business leaders we need to work together to unlock the value of disabled talent across society.”

Additionally, along with PwC and KPMG, Deloitte has partnered with IT consultancy firm Auticon to introduce neurodiverse talent into its workforce, capitalising on the unique talents of autistic IT consultants.

Richard Houston, senior partner and chief executive officer of Deloitte UK, North and South Europe, said: “We’re committed to ensuring our firm is inclusive, where individual differences are respected and valued.

“An inclusive culture means encouraging true diversity of thought and creating an environment what allows everyone to play to their strengths.”


  • In the next few months, Accountancy Age will be taking an in-depth look at diversity within the financial professional community. If you would like to share your experience within the industry, please send us an email.

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