How to attract the perfect client

How to attract the perfect client

Are you spending time and money on marketing, but failing to attract the clients you want? Vicki Banthorpe explains how to get ahead

How to attract the perfect client

Are you spending time and money on marketing, but failing to attract the clients you want? Here’s why…..

Who are your target clients?

When I ask partners in accounting firms to answer this question, a common response is ‘everyone’. However, in reality this is not usually the case. Indeed when you start to think about it there are usually lots of people or businesses that you don’t want as clients!

This can be the fundamental flaw when it comes to marketing your accounting firm. Without clearly identifying who you would like to have as clients you risk adopting a scatter gun approach to your marketing. As a result, marketing activities are implemented on an ad hoc basis without considering who the end reader or participant will be. At best, this may generate new clients but not of the type you want. At worst, you may not attract any new clients at all.

So let’s ask a better question – “Who are your perfect clients?”

By identifying who your perfect client is you can tailor your marketing strategy to implement only marketing activities which will get you in front of these potential ‘perfect’ clients.

The result: less wasted resource (time, money and effort) and more of the clients you want.

So what do you need to do to identify and focus on your perfect clients, rather than trying to appeal to everyone?

Define your perfect client

There are no right or wrong answers when it comes to defining your perfect client. Your perfect client may be different to your competitors and this can give you a competitive advantage. Your perfect client definition may also change over the years. Frequently I see new accounting firms, who are eager to grow their client base, targeting business start-ups as they tend to be quicker and easier to convert into new clients. However, as the firm develops quite often the focus changes to targeting established businesses, perhaps in a niche sector.

A good way to define your perfect client is to start with your existing client base. Take a look through your client list and consider:

  • What is the profile of your best clients?
  • Who are your most profitable clients?
  • In which sector(s) can you add value to clients?
  • What type of clients do you enjoy working with?
  • What type of client do you want to attract in the future?

Once you have created your profile of a perfect client, you then need to research the best ways to start communicating with them.

Where does your perfect client ‘hang out’?

Think about: What do these people read? What business events do they attend? What professional associations are they members of? Find out the answers by asking current clients of a similar profile or asking business associates and introducers for their input. When you have identified this, you need to make sure your firm is also ‘hanging out’ in similar places.

Nail your value proposition

Before you undertake any marketing activities, think about how you add value to your existing clients. If you are not sure ask them! Use this information in your marketing messages when trying to attract new clients (if you want more of the same clients). Getting your messaging right is vital.

Ways of getting in front of your perfect clients

So, you’ve created your list of perfect clients. Here’s what you can do to get in front of them and start developing the conversation.

Introductions – think about who could introduce you to your perfect clients – staff, current clients, business associates, LinkedIn connections, family?

Profile raising – having identified where your perfect clients ‘hang-out’, aim to be part of their world. Attend networking events they go to, place adverts or write articles in relevant newspapers/magazines they read, connect with them on social media platforms.

Direct marketing activities – where you have gathered their business contact details and have their consent or a legitimate interest to contact them, do keep in touch. Consider ways to introduce your firm and how you could help them. If you have previously met them, think of ways to keep developing the conversation.

Repetition – keep communicating with them by mailings, emails, networking events, social media, digital advertising etc., don’t let them forget who you are.

Monitor – review your enquiries. Are you getting the sales leads you require? If not, review the messages you are sending out, are these hitting the spot? What can you do differently?

Whilst identifying and marketing to your perfect clients may take a little longer to set up, as opposed to blanket marketing to everyone, in the long run it will be more effective. You will be more selective in the marketing channels you adopt, which reduces the likelihood of reacting to ad hoc marketing opportunities you receive. This in turn can help save time and money on activities which are unlikely to get you in front of your perfect client and therefore not give you the sales conversions you desire.

Whitepaper

The Future of Finance is in the CFO's Hands

Business The Future of Finance is in the CFO's Hands

2m
Save a Week a Month Consolidating Accounts

Accounting Software Save a Week a Month Consolidating Accounts

3m
Mitigating Risk Through Internal Control

Legal Mitigating Risk Through Internal Control

4m
Could tax season have run more efficiently?

Corporate Tax Could tax season have run more efficiently?

4m

Related Articles

KPMG bullying scandal: “not everyone likes the outcome of our processes”

Big Four KPMG bullying scandal: “not everyone likes the outcome of our processes”

15h Dave Beach
Taxing tech giants: the challenges accountants should know

Tax Taxing tech giants: the challenges accountants should know

15h Dave Beach
IFRS 17 is an “opportunity” for accountants

Accounting Standards IFRS 17 is an “opportunity” for accountants

17h Tom Lemmon
Financial reporting – a new era beckons for professionals, directors and their insurers

Audit Financial reporting – a new era beckons for professionals, directors and their insurers

21h Rebecca Smith, Partner
What's next for IR35

Tax What's next for IR35

22h James Poyser
Why being an outstanding number-cruncher is no longer enough

Practice Why being an outstanding number-cruncher is no longer enough

2d Sponsored | Roy Sheppard
Compliance vs advisory: share and share alike

Practice Compliance vs advisory: share and share alike

2d Stephen Tucker, Senior consultant
KPMG slapped with $50m fine over past audit work

Audit KPMG slapped with $50m fine over past audit work

2d Tom Lemmon